Hanging a rock star Natalie Dormer’s picnic: “I don’t want to wear a corset again”

In February last year, Natalie Dormer found herself in Australia, wearing a corset, a hat, a veil and a costume made of wool. She is filming a new six-part show, on a rocky picnic, she plays a heroine, her past haunts her, and the opening ceremony requires her to take a few 7-minute shots at 35 °C.

Under makeup and clothing, Domar sweated. Basically, this is the Bikram agent.

“I think sometimes people forget that performance is a cardiovascular exercise,” the 36-year-old said, when we met in the air conditioning in the BBC meeting room. “When I take off my corset, you don’t want to be anywhere near me because it will honk.”

Still, her art is worth the pain. In a rock-hanging picnic, Domer provided an excellent subtle expression, like Hester Appleyard, a traumatized woman who tried to reinvent herself at the turn of the 20th century. At the other end of the world. The series was adapted from a novel written by Australian writer Joan Lindsay in 1967, which was adapted from Peter Weir to the big screen in 1975.

It tells the story of a group of young female students missing in the Australian bush after a veritable Valentine’s Day picnic. As the unresolved mystery began to spread, the Hester Girls’ Principal was in a frenzied world of speculation. Directed by Canadian Larysa Kondracki, the show gives the whole thing a rich, magical, almost punk rock quality.

“When people think of a group of three young girls and a teacher missing, people’s imaginations will be crazy,” Domer said. “Is this a murder? Is it abuse? Is it malnourished in the middle of the country? Are they running away? Your imagination will only take you there.”

In the embarrassing paranoia, Hester began to tighten and cold, sports high collar and strict hair style. In the end, “her clothes became slightly breathable and the hair became a bit messy,” Domer said.

“Whether it is Blanche Dubois or Hamlet, an actor who plays the understanding of the heart is very interesting. But it also brings costs. The picnic is very dark; because Hester does not like himself, and she has many unresolved The pain and trauma, so the residue does leave [on you]. As an actor, you have to leave that at the end, which is not always easy. She is more difficult to get rid of than many [roles].”

Given that Thomas’ previous role included playing Anne Bolin in the lustrous drama “Tudor Dynasty”, they were eventually beheaded; Margaery Tyrell in the “Game of Thrones” married her brother’s male for political expediency The lover, then married the anti-social teenager Joffrey Baratheon, and then died in the hell of her mother-in-law, this is no small recognition. “This is harder to get rid of than the power game,” she insisted. After playing Hester, she needed to stop working and find it by listening to happy music, sports, meditation, yoga and running.

Dormer was raised by her mother and her stepfather, a construction contractor, in Berkshire, who has always wanted to be an actor. “It’s always there. I hope I have a good Eureka moment story. There really isn’t one.”

She is an only child. Until she was seven years old, a younger sister and a younger brother appeared continuously, so she was very used to playing with a dressing box alone and inventing stories to entertain herself. After attending a local independent school and gaining a place to study history in Cambridge, she failed to obtain the necessary A-level results, but went to the Weber Douglas School of Dramatic Art in London.

These days, she lives in London with her fiancé, television and film director Anthony Bourne, who spent five weeks in Australia when she was taking a picnic on the rock. She said: “We always refer to each other’s work and observe each other’s work.”

Recently, they collaborated in the “darkness”, a thriller for a London show, directed by Bourne and co-authored by him and Domer, who performed a blind pianist who accidentally heard the murder . “I want to be dark with him because I have been watching him for years, I am stunned by other actors. I thought, ‘He is a very good director!’ I can only assume that he thinks that I am right as an actress. Or he won’t hire me.

She also wants to create her own material because she sees a lack of complex, interesting female parts. When she graduated from the drama school, Domer had no plans (“the only declaration was to pay my bills”), but she continued to receive works during the offering period. After a while, their charm began to become gloomy. (The picnic in the hanging rock is an exception to the rule, because, she said, “the script really caught me.”)

“I have no desire, Elizabeth, once again into the corset,”

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