Is it thin in the stomach? The corset is coming back, there are health problems Erin Bray’s black satin chest corset, which works in the sunlit downtown

studio, is very elegant. Steel bone and rigidity, each garment has five front buttons. On its back, a thick ribbon passes through a row of holes, ready to pull tighter and become a twisted hourglass.

“A suitable corset won’t stretch,” Bree said. “The more corsets you wear, the more you control your body.”

Bray is a professional bodice that has been handcrafted Victorian fashion pieces for over a decade, often used by brides, role-playing enthusiasts and eclectic fashionistas. However, recently, her business has been promoted by “waist training” women – wearing tight corsets on a regular basis, hoping to reduce waist circumference in the long run.

In recent months, celebrities such as Kim Kardashian and Jessica Alba have released photos of their corsets on social media, calling them miracle weight loss solutions. And it has attracted thousands of virtual waist-reduction games on Pinterest and Instagram, and this trend has soared. Believers say this can reduce waist circumference, but doctors warn that this can lead to digestive problems and shortness of breath.
Some women wear deep corsets like Bray’s real corsets made in Sacramento. Recently, she has produced two to five daily local and international clients.

But most people who are reducing their waist circumference use latex “cinchers” – softer, more elastic items, with zippers or snaps instead of laces that can be worn under or over the clothes. They cost more than $40 compared to the $150 artisan corset on the Bray website.

Many women who travel on waist training say they wear cinchers for 12 hours a day, sometimes sleeping.

Dominique Young, who runs online sportswear business in North Natomas, says wearing a tights can reduce her waistline by 6 inches in a few months. She said it was effective because she would sweat even if she was at her desk or grocery store.

She said that her customers have achieved the same success and are constantly turning back. Young sells 60 to 80 waist trainers on Shapeciti.com in a month and sells 200 per month during the holidays. In the spring, she plans to open a Roseville boutique to sell abdomen clothing.

“When you’re at the gym, you sweat more than you don’t have,” she said. “You will start to see your belly deformed. …this does not hurt your body.”

Health professionals disagree. Rachel Friberg, a behavioral health educator and dietitian at the Palo Alto Medical Foundation, said that when worn for long periods of time, the trainer and the corset can push the stomach up into the lungs, causing acid reflux. And limit the ability of the wearer to take a deep breath. .

“There are a lot of trends that should not be returned,” she said of the craze of corsets. “If your intestines are pushed into your lungs, it’s obviously not where they should be. Your internal organs need this space to function properly.”

Fresno’s history professor Gilferz said that even in the uncomfortable situation, reshaping the female body has always been fashionable. In the Victorian era, women pushed the pain tolerance to the limit as they squeezed into the corset until a sleepy sofa was installed in the stairwell.

She said that although these garments have never really been outdated, they are now particularly popular because women are trying to find the tiny waistline they see online.

“This image of the hourglass has always been about strengthening the difference between women and men,” she said. “For women, this is about the waist, which makes the body look super female. This is a pornographic element.”

Bray wears a corset in a social setting, sometimes saying at work that women should not feel pain after wearing them. She said that the corset should be comfortable, comfortable, and even provide useful back support for those standing and bending.

She said that the wearer of the first corset should wear only 3 to 5 inches from the natural waist and consult their doctor about any problems.

“You want your body to adapt to the corset, and the corset is used to your body,” Bree said. “You can’t go all out at once.”

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